Monday, September 11, 2017

Oil Shock I (1973) and Japanese Automobile Market Shift

Hi folks -- when an Americanist like myself thinks of Oil Shock I, we focus narrowly on the US market and the rise of the Japanese Auto industry post-1973. What follows, however,  is data taken from Ward's Automotive Yearbook, 1977, that gives us a bigger picture of what was happening to the global automotive market with regards to Japanese vehicles. It appears that post-1973 the Japanese industry realized that it could not simply count on the U.S. for sales of its cars, trucks, and buses. And so it reached out to other opportunities around the globe, and did so successfully. The U.S. industry followed a bit of this strategy, but of course without a strong small car component, was limited in its impact overseas.

Japan Automotive Industry, Total Cars, Trucks and Buses, Exported

To Asia
1971 – 196,184
1972 – 224,536
1973 – 296,607
1974 – 428,959
1975 – 531,645
1976 – 747,387

To Africa
1971 – 171,440
1972 – 123,420
1973 – 146,967
1974 – 214,001
1975 – 217,294
1976 – 237,112

 To Europe
1971 – 217,395
1972 – 368,025
1973 –404,414
1974 – 388,302
1975 – 528,486
1976 – 706, 579

To Americas

1971 – 1, 061,948
1972 – 1,124,630
1973 – 1,036,389
1974 – 1,293,755
1975 – 1,147,463
1976 – 1,683,715

To Oceania

1971 – 131,852
1972 – 124,535
1973 – 182,920
1974 – 292,789
1975 – 251,426
1976 – 333,459


Totals

1971 – 1,779024
1972 – 1,965,404
1973 – 2,067,556
1974 – 2,618,087
1975 – 2,677,612

1976 – 3,709,808




Here is an interesting contemporary map representing the current export of used cars from one from one Japanese company:


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